I bought the Ironmaster Super Bench when I bought my Ironmaster IM2000. I got it as part of a package deal that included the leg accessory (for leg curls and leg extensions), the preacher curl accessory, the crunch accessory and the dip accessory.

My Requirements

I was after a good quality flat-incline-decline bench that could take attachments for things like leg curls, leg extensions, crunches and preacher curls. I had a budget of £500, for which I hoped to get the bench itself and one or two attachments.

My intended use was as part of a home gym for which I have a small amount of space set aside in a (large) bedroom.

Assembly

This thing comes almost fully assembled and all you have to do is attach the feet to it and you're good to go. If you bought any accessories, they'll need some minor assembly too. I assembled the bench and the various accessories listed above in less than an hour on my own.

Ironmaster Superbench 3/4 view.
Ironmaster Superbench - 3/4 View.

Dimensions and Weight

The footprint of this bench — by which I mean the actual space it takes up where it makes contact with the floor — is 41 inches by 18.75 inches (104.1 cm x 47.5 cm) and in the flat position the pad extends the length a further three inches over the footprint. The top of the pad is 20.5 inches (52 cm) above the floor. The pad itself measures 44 inches by 10 inches (111.75 cm x 25.4c m) and it's 3 inches (7.62 cm) thick.

The bench weighs 60 lbs (27.2 kg) and has a 1000 lbs rating in the flat position, 600 lbs in the incline or upright positions. That’s a high enough rating for 99% of people and only a very advanced powerlifter of strongman would need more.

Adjustability

Ironmaster Superbench inclined with seat.
Ironmaster Superbench - Inclined With Seat.
The bench adjusts to 11 different angles: 0 (flat), 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 85 degrees. That's incline or decline because you just turn the bench around to angle it the other way. That's a good range of adjustments for a bench. It is adjusted by a lever underneath the bench and you can operate this with either your hand or your foot (for lazy people like me!).

The seat is detachable and slots into any one of three slots in the bench, giving it a height of 12, 14 or 16 inches above the floor with the bench in the upright position. The seat doesn't adjust separately so it's always at 90 degrees to the surface of the bench. This may be uncomfortable for some people but I've never had a problem with it, although it does sit a little low (even when in its highest position) for me for shoulder pressing when the bench is in the (near) upright position.

Accessories

Ironmaster Superbench leg attachment.
Ironmaster Superbench - Leg Attachment.
One end of the bench has a slot for all the accessories, such as the preacher attachment, the crunch attachment, the leg extension/curl attachment, the dip attachment and the chinning attachment.

Criticisms

One criticism I have of this otherwise excellent bench is that it's a bit too high for me. I'm about average height (5ft 10) but the Super Bench, at 20.5 inches (52 cm), sits too high off the floor for me to anchor myself firmly for the flat bench press (it's fine for incline work). It's about 1.5 inches too high for me, so what I have to do is put a 20 kg plate either side of the bench to rest my feet on. It's still a bit high even then but it's workable. In terms of height, the bench is probably ideally suited for someone 6ft tall or over.

Because the bench consists of one platform, without an attached, adjustable seat that will remain flat when the back of the bench is declined, you can't really do decline work on it unless you also purchase the crunch attachment to hook your feet under. This is a good attachment to have anyway, but I can't help but think it should be distributed as standard with the bench. I can see how the other attachments are 'optional extras' but you simply can't do any decline work on the bench without the crunch attachment.

Stability

For the most part the bench is exceptionally stable. It is a bit wobbly when using the dip attachment, although not unduly so, and I've heard the chinning attachment is wobbly too (although I don't have that attachment, so I don't know for sure), but in general it's rock solid.

Ironmaster Superbench in upright position.
Ironmaster Superbench - Upright Position.

Conclusion

The Ironmaster Super Bench suffers from the one or two problems I've mentioned above but, over all, I think this is an excellent bench. It has a high-quality feel about it, it's sturdy and it's versatile with all the attachments available for it.

I think you would struggle to find a better quality, multi-purpose bench at this price point. Yes, there are better single-purpose benches around — proper powerlifting benches, for example — but this bench can host a number of attachments and it's ideal for a home gym.

I think it looks great and is worth the price too.

I’ve used it for flat, incline and decline bench presses, shoulder presses, sit-ups, crunches, preacher curls, dips, leg extensions, leg curls, pullovers and as a general base to either sit or lean on for things like dumbbell rows or concentration curls.

Star Rating Explained

Ironmaster Superbench crunch attachment.
Ironmaster Superbench - Crunch Attachment.
I gave the Ironmaster Super Bench four stars because I think it’s a great bench overall but I took half a star off because I think the crunch attachment is absolutely necessary if you want to do any decline work and should therefore be included for free. I took another half star off because it’s just a fraction too high for me. If I was 5ft 5 that would probably be unfair but I’m average height at 5ft 10.

I’m starting to mark quite hard in my reviews so don’t let my four stars lead you to believe this is anything but an extremely capable bench that would be hard to top in this price bracket.